November 2010
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Month November 2010

Unlocked Palm Pre 2 only $250 for webOS developers

The Palm Pre 2 is now available, and if you’ve been wanting to get your hands on one to use as a developer device, HP wants to help. We’re excited to announce that developers will be able to purchase an unlocked UMTS Palm Pre 2 smartphone online in the United States at a $200 discount. Just send an email to pdc@palm.com to request a coupon!

A really sweet deal for webOS developers on the Pre 2. Kudos, Palm!

Source: Palm Developer Center via PreCentral

Palm Pre 2 selling unlocked, rocking webOS 2.0 for $450 from HP

You can now purchase a completely unlocked Palm Pre 2 from HP here in the US for a very reasonable $449.99. The Palm Pre 2 is powered by TI’s 1GHz OMAP 3630 chipset and has 512MB of RAM and 16GB of storage. The distinctive sliding portrait keyboard remains as does the respectable albeit dated HVGA display, although the front face now uses Corning’s Gorilla Glass. The camera has also been upgraded with a 5-megapixel sensor, but is still fixed focus.

Of course, the real appeal of the Palm Pre 2 is that it is currently the only device running HP webOS 2.0 — the latest version of the killer smartphone OS Palm awed the world with at CES 2009. webOS 2.0 is slated to hit all other Palm devices ‘in the coming months’ and a plethora of new devices — including a tablet — are slated for 2011.

If you insist on having webOS 2.0 now or are a developer eager to get started with webOS development, the Palm Pre 2 is an excellent device with hardware on par with all the latest and greatest smartphones and software that eclipses nearly everything else on the market. The Pre 2 will also be available on Verizon before year’s end for those who don’t mind a contract with Big Red.

Update: webOS developers can get an unlocked Pre 2 for $250.

Source: HP via SlashGear

Google Docs now supports mobile editing for iPhone, Android

Nice, basic implementation of a feature that many — including myself — have been (im)patiently waiting for. Thanks, Google!

Source: Google Mobile Blog via Engadget

Rubinstein urges webOS faithful to ‘be patient’ at Web 2.0 Summit

We’ve got some great stuff coming. If you are a webOS aficionado out there, be patient. The pool of webOS devices is going to grow very dramatically over the next 12 to 18 months.

Watch out, Apple. Palm wants its throne back — and with webOS at the helm and HP at its sails, it’s only a matter of time.

Sources: Web 2.0 Summit, EE Times via IntoMobile

BoxWave Keyboard Buddy Case for iPhone 4

One of the top complaints about the iPhone that Apple cannot address fully with iOS updates has been its lack of a physical keyboard. When iOS 4 was rolled out in June, Bluetooth keyboard support was enabled and gave iPhone users the option of pairing a hardware keyboard with Apple’s darling. I, particularly, have been waiting for a quality landscape-oriented, slide-out keyboard case to try out — and although solutions exist — none have managed to pique my interest. Enter BoxWave’s Keyboard Buddy Case for iPhone 4.

This thing looks mighty impressive — solid, slim, and stylish. If the ergonomics and balance of the Keyboard Buddy can match its form, it might even be worth its $70 price tag. BoxWave starts shipping its Keyboard Buddy Case on December 14, but those anxious to Droidify their iPhones can pre-order now at the link below.

Source: BoxWave via Engadget

Facebook Messages in 4:11

Here is Facebook’s official YouTube video that explains the concept behind its new messaging platform. You can also read more about it here on Facebook’s official blog.

Although I find the idea of simpler sharing refreshing, it is not a novel idea and by no means a simple task to implement effectively on a grand scale. Notwithstanding, Facebook is dead on when it says that ‘all you should need to send a message is the person and the message.’ In fact, this is how all communication should work — the means of communication are extraneous — only the persons communicating and the message are relevant.

Relatively soon, we’ll probably all stop using arbitrary ten digit numbers and bizarre sequences of characters to contact each other. We will just select friends by name and be able to share with them instantly. We aren’t there yet, but the changes today are a small first step.

This is the end goal, and I am delighted that Facebook realizes this and is taking ‘a small first step’ towards that goal. However, I am still skeptical that Facebook will be instrumental in the grand scheme of making simple sharing a reality.

Official Google Voice app lands in App Store

The Beatles and Google Voice hit iTunes on the same day. Hell hath frozen over.

Download here.

Source: Google Voice Blog via TechCrunch

The Beatles. Now on iTunes.

The picture says it all.

Android 2.3 Gingerbread supports NFC contactless payments

TechCrunch is reporting that Google CEO Eric Schmidt let loose at Web Summit 2.0 that Near Field Communication (NFC) support was baked into Android 2.3 Gingerbread.

NFC is a mobile technology that will allow for phones equipped with a special chip to perform specific actions in proximity to special sensors. The applications abound, but the most prevalent one is the ability to make and accept payments via mobile phone.

With Nokia and Apple slated to reveal NFC compatible devices in 2011, it looks like the mobile phone might make yet another item obsolete: the wallet.

via TechCrunch

WSJ: Apple gets digital rights to Beatles — live streaming, new logo will have to wait

The Wall Street Journal is reporting that tomorrow’s iTunes announcement will be that Apple has finally acquired digital rights to the Beatles catalog.

Apple Inc. is preparing to announce that its iTunes Store will soon start carrying music by the Beatles, according to people familiar with the situation, a move that would fill in a glaring gap in the collection of the world’s largest music retailer.

Looks like iTunes in the cloud is the pipe dream now.

Source: The Wall Street Journal